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dc.contributor.authorKhalil, Amani Mohameden_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-04T16:41:07Z
dc.date.available2020-03-04T16:41:07Z
dc.date.issued1987
dc.date.submitted1987
dc.identifier.otherb18444830
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39666
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes photographs.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (D.Sc.D.)--Boston University. Henry M. Goldman School of Graduate Dentistry, 1987 (Pediatric Dentistry)en_US
dc.descriptionBibliography : leaves 63-70.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhen pit and fissure sealants were first introduced ln the late 1960's, they were not universally accepted. Today, however, sealants are used more frequently and their safety and effectiveness in preventing occlusalal caries have been proven time and again by dental researchers. The first of these studies was conducted by Cueto and Buonocore in 1967[14]. Since then numerous other studies have confirmed that sealants effectively prevent occlusal caries. A fissure is fully protected against caries as long as it is completely sealed[27,53,57]. Indeed, not a single study has shown that caries developed in pits and fissures under an intact sealant. This preventive measure enjoys the advantages of tooth conservation and the simplicity of application that allows its administration by relatively unskilled personnel. To provide adequate protection of caries-susceptible areas on the occlusal surfaces of molars and premolars, the sealant must be retained for a significant time (i.e. beyond one or two years). Once a part of the fissure has become uncovered by loss of sealant, protection against caries is no longer assured. Although clinical studies of the efficacy of fissure sealants have shown excellent sealant retention with high percentage of occlusal caries reduction,[40,59,63] the problem of loss of sealant still exists. Sealant loss is dependent on two main factors, the application technique at the time of placement which is controllable by the operator and the wear forces in the oral cavity. In addition to the earlier resin based pit and fissure sealants, glass lonomer cements have been introduced in the 1970's as potential sealants among other uses. These materials have the advantage of forming a bond with calcium ions and do not require etching of the enamel prior to their application. The literature is lacking information concerning the abrasion resistance of different resin sealants and glass lonomer materials, but wear may be an important factor of sealant loss. The present investigation is an attempt to qualify wear resistance of different sealant systems in vitro using the toothbrush abrasion technique.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectPit and fissure sealantsen_US
dc.subjectToothbrushingen_US
dc.titleToothbrush abrasion resistance of different pit and fissure sealant systems in vitroen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Science in Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePediatric Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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