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dc.contributor.authorZhao, Mingen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Rourke, Joseph G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Jason T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKnutson, Heather A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurrows, Adamen_US
dc.contributor.authorFortney, Johnathanen_US
dc.contributor.authorNgo, Henryen_US
dc.contributor.authorFulton, Benjamin J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBaranec, Christophen_US
dc.contributor.authorRiddle, Reeden_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Nicholas M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMuirhead, Philip S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHinkley, Sashaen_US
dc.contributor.authorShowman, Adam P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Jasonen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurruss, Ricken_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-08T15:36:47Z
dc.date.available2020-04-08T15:36:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000344878900044&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationMing Zhao, Joseph G O'Rourke, Jason T Wright, Heather A Knutson, Adam Burrows, Johnathan Fortney, Henry Ngo, Benjamin J Fulton, Christoph Baranec, Reed Riddle, Nicholas M Law, Philip S Muirhead, Sasha Hinkley, Adam P Showman, Jason Curtis, Rick Burruss. 2014. "CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE HOT JUPITER HAT-P-32Ab AND THE M-DWARF COMPANION HAT-P-32B." ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, Volume 796, Issue 2, 15 pp. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-637X/796/2/115
dc.identifier.issn0004-637X
dc.identifier.issn1538-4357
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40049
dc.description.abstractWe report secondary eclipse photometry of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab, taken with Hale/WIRC in H and KS bands and with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We carried out adaptive optics imaging of the planet host star HAT-P-32A and its companion HAT-P-32B in the near-IR and the visible. We clearly resolve the two stars from each other and find a separation of 2.′′923 ± 0.′′004 and a position angle 110.◦64 ± 0.◦12. We measure the flux ratios of the binary in g′r′i′z′ and H & KS bands, and determine Teff = 3565 ± 82 K for the companion star, corresponding to an M1.5 dwarf. We use PHOENIX stellar atmosphere models to correct the dilution of the secondary eclipse depths of the hot Jupiter due to the presence of the M1.5 companion. We also improve the secondary eclipse photometry by accounting for the non-classical, flux-dependent nonlinearity of the WIRC IR detector in the H band. We measure planet-to-star flux ratios of 0.090 ± 0.033%, 0.178 ± 0.057%, 0.364 ± 0.016%, and 0.438 ± 0.020% in the H, KS, 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. We compare these with planetary atmospheric models, and find they prefer an atmosphere with a temperature inversion and inefficient heat redistribution. However, we also find that the data are equally well-described by a blackbody model for the planet with Tp = 2042 ± 50 K. Finally, we measure a secondary eclipse timing offset of 0.3 ± 1.3 min from the predicted mid-eclipse time, which constrains e = 0.0072+0.0700 −0.0064 when combined with RV data and is more consistent with a circular orbit.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the anonymous referee for valuable comments for the paper. We thank the Palomar staff for their help with the observations. M.Z. is supported by funding from NASA Origins of Solar Systems grant NNX14AD22G and the Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds at the Pennsylvania State University. The Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds is supported by the Pennsylvania State University, the Eberly College of Science, and the Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium.J.G.O. receives support from the National Science Foundation's Graduate Research Fellowship Program. H.N. acknowledges funding support from the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada. A. B. acknowledges support in part under NASA HST grants HST-GO-12181.04-A, HST-GO-12314.03-A, HST-GO-12473.06-A, and HST-GO-12550.02, and JPL/Spitzer Agreements 1417122, 1348668, 1371432, 1377197, and 1439064. S.H. acknowledges support from the NASA Sagan Fellowship at California Institute of Technology. C.B. acknowledges support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.The Robo-AO system is supported by collaborating partner institutions, the California Institute of Technology and the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, by the National Science Foundation under grant Nos. AST-0906060, AST-0960343, and AST-1207891, by a grant from the Mt. Cuba Astronomical Foundation and by a gift from Samuel Oschin.Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation. (NNX14AD22G - NASA Origins of Solar Systems; Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds at the Pennsylvania State University; Pennsylvania State University; Eberly College of Science; Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium; National Science Foundation's Graduate Research Fellowship Program; Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada; HST-GO-12181.04-A - NASA HST; HST-GO-12314.03-A - NASA HST; HST-GO-12473.06-A - NASA HST; HST-GO-12550.02 - NASA HST; 1417122 - JPL/Spitzer Agreements; 1348668 - JPL/Spitzer Agreements; 1371432 - JPL/Spitzer Agreements; 1377197 - JPL/Spitzer Agreements; 1439064 - JPL/Spitzer Agreements; NASA Sagan Fellowship at California Institute of Technology; Alfred P. Sloan Foundation; California Institute of Technology; Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics; AST-0906060 - National Science Foundation; AST-0960343 - National Science Foundation; AST-1207891 - National Science Foundation; Mt. Cuba Astronomical Foundation; W.M. Keck Foundation)en_US
dc.format.extent15 pagesen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen_US
dc.relation.ispartofASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectPhysical sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAstronomy & astrophysicsen_US
dc.subjectBinaries: generalen_US
dc.subjectInfrared: planetary systemsen_US
dc.subjectPlanetary systemsen_US
dc.subjectStars: individual (HAT-P-32A, HAT-P-32B)en_US
dc.subjectTechniques: high angular resolutionen_US
dc.subjectTechniques: photometricen_US
dc.subjectInfrared thermal emissionen_US
dc.subjectSystematic retrieval analysisen_US
dc.subjectExtrasolar giant planetsen_US
dc.subjectGround-based detectionsen_US
dc.subjectLaser adaptive opticsen_US
dc.subjectSecondary eclipseen_US
dc.subjectLight curvesen_US
dc.subjectTransmission spectrumen_US
dc.subjectReciprocity failureen_US
dc.subjectTransiting planetsen_US
dc.subjectAstronomical and space sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAtomic, molecular, nuclear, particle and plasma physicsen_US
dc.subjectPhysical chemistry (incl. structural)en_US
dc.subjectEarth and planetary astrophysicsen_US
dc.titleCharacterization of the atmosphere of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab and the M-dwarf companion HAT-P-32Ben_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/0004-637X/796/2/115
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Astronomyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-0638-8822 (Muirhead, Philip S)
dc.identifier.mycv41658


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